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What is Brazing?

   

Brazing is a joining process traditionally applied to metals (but also to ceramics) in which molten filler metal (the braze alloy) flows into the joint.

The melting point of the filler metal is above 450°C, but always below the melting temperature of the parts to be joined, which distinguishes the process from welding where high temperatures are used to melt the base metals together.

The filler metal, while heated slightly above melting point, is protected by a suitable atmosphere which is often a flux. The molten filler metal cools to join the workpieces together providing a strong join between similar or dissimilar metals.

The atmospheres in which the brazing process can be undertaken include air, combusted fuel gas, ammonia, nitrogen, hydrogen, noble gases, inorganic vapours and vacuum, using a variety of heating sources such as torch, furnace, and induction coil.

To achieve a sound brazed joint, the filler and parent materials should be metallurgically compatible, and the joint design should incorporate a gap into which the molten braze filler can be drawn or distributed by capillary action. The required joint gap is dependent on many factors, including the brazing atmosphere and the composition of the base material and braze alloy.

Ideal for joining dissimilar metals, brazing is a commercially accepted process used in a wide range of industries due to its flexibility and the high integrity to which joints may be produced. This makes it reliable in critical and non-critical applications, and it is one of the most widely used joining methods.

Brazing Expertise

TWI has extensive experience and expertise in brazing processes and related factors such as process selection, metallurgy, design and testing.

Related Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

For more information on brazing, please email:


contactus@twi.co.uk